Bags of Frogs

When one lives in the country, on the edge of a village, with vacant land on two sides, within sight of one dam wall, and within walking distance of that dam and another, as well as with a lei* water channel and a sloot** bounding 180º of our property, we have more than our fair share of mosquitos.  We are also blessed with other creatures that are associated with water:  from dragonflies to mud crabs and frogs. Also, with a reed ceiling in a few places downstairs, and particularly in summer, spiders spin webs across the staircase overnight. I don’t dislike spiders – they are good at catching other creepy crawlies – but I don’t like the cobwebs, particularly if they “attack” me first thing in the morning on the way to the kitchen. SandbagHouseStairs I met our first frog within days of our moving into the house, three years ago.  I had left my handbag on a chair, and a when I went to pick it up, or get something out of it, my purse was under guard. frogGuardingPurseNeedless to say, I was somewhat startled, but given that the house had been unoccupied for a couple of months, I guess we’d moved into “their” space.  A few days later, I found this little chap lurking in a storage basket in our then Heath Robinson kitchen.  And that’s a teaspoon on the right of the picture… BabyFrogTeaspoonRecognising that frogs’ diet is spiders, insects and that sort of thing, getting them out of the house was not high on our priority list, and even our cats learned to share their watering hole with the frogs. MelonAndFrog It seems that the frogs live happily in the house:  they come in during the night when we leave our kitchen door open.  We don’t often see them, but we know that they ‘re here.  The evidence is in the watering hole. FrogJamWaterHole That doesn’t bother us, or the cats:  we just clean out the water and start again.  They do, however, lurk in a few interesting places: The mint, just outside the back door, which means s/he gets a good wetting roughly once a day. FrogInMint This chap, however, seems to like bags.  I found him in a basket with another handbag next to my desk in the office.  I unwittingly dislodged him and sat him on my office chair. FrogOfficeChair This one, or perhaps the same one, was very happy in the bag in which I store my money box and other essential bits for the market on Saturdays. FrogInPinkBag I was sad to have to evict him.  He seems to have been quite a happy chappy!

* lei – lead water channel for irrigation
**sloot – drainage channel

© Fiona’s Favourites


16 thoughts on “Bags of Frogs

    1. Oh, yee of little faith! For a wannabe veggie who gave up eating escargot years ago, and spends a lot of time not thinking about how any meat I cook gets to my kitchen…. 🙂

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      1. Ali is vegetarian (meat doesn’t agree with her, rather than queasiness) and you can eat extremely delicious food without any meat involved, if you know how to do it. It’s travelling that is difficult. In Germany, vegetarian means with a salad with an egg on top. In Italy, same with pastrami on top. In France, it’s forbidden in any form, by law. And as for Spain. don’t even think about it.

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      2. I actually prefer meatless meals; when I lived on my own, I rarely had meat in the house. As a consequence, I now find it difficult to eat too much meat. Tom, on the other hand, having been a beef rancher, having eaten meat for every meal (sometimes 4x a day), and having butchered his own meat, is a dedicated carnivore who does enjoy vegetables. Thank heaven!

        Funny, I had really good vegetarian meals when I was in Spain a few years ago… In SA, vegetarian options are becoming more popular and there are more and more vegetarian options on menus. However, it’s more difficult in some parts of the Platteland and I do get somewhat incensed when the vegetarian menu includes a tuna salad or sandwich and/or a vegetarian pizza comes with ham or bacon! Perhaps in South Africa we’re a bit over-sensitised to dietary proclivities!

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  1. How wonderful that you have frogs! I’m not sure if they’re very quiet where we live, in Eastern Washington, or just not comfortable with our climate extremes, or have been wiped out … We are quite close to a huge river and I would expect to hear them (in summer, anyway), but never do. It worries me a bit, knowing how important they are!

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    1. We love the frogs. And no, they’re not quiet – when they’re outside, anyway. When we first moved here, the sounds were of the clicky variety. Now they croak. We’re not sure why, although we have been told that because the municipality stupidly sprayed, an entire generation of frogs and other useful creepies was wiped out. I have noticed that our mosquito problem is not as bad this year as in past years. The other problem that we have in spring, is midges. They somehow manage to get inside one’s clothes and their bites are vicious, leaving enormous red blotches that take a week to 10 days to clear up, and then still leave a mark. We also have tadpoles in the sloot in spring….

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      1. I WISH there was less blind enthusiasm for spraying! I know malaria is a very big deal – and other diseases as well … but there have to be better solutions than toxins that wipe out creatures that we need to survive!

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      2. I agree with you. The sad thing, here, is that we’re not in a malaria area, which means that the spraying has nothing to do with that. Rather, we were told, it had to do with weed control. There is such a fine line to walk around things such as food security, pest and disease control.

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      3. Well, we have some great initiatives in SA. The Leopard Toad project, for example, which is working to protect this frog, and Cape Point Vineyards even has a wine (very nice, by the way) range in its honour. Check this out: http://splatteredtoad.com/?page_id=35

        You’ll also find a link to more information about the conservation project there. Looking at those pictures, our little fellas are Leopard Toads. Thanks for making me look. Perhaps this will give you a little lift… Riddip!

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    1. Isn’t he just! I was glad to have caught him on camera. Usually, he just plops out and hops underneath something. I’m not partial to grovelling on the floor after creepy or hippity hoppity things 🙂

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  2. Gorgeous photos. We’ve been lucky enough to share two houses with frogs. The first one wasn’t two far from a river and one day I found three of them on the stone floor of my larder area. I picked each one up and took them into the garden, hopefully they went back to the river. They were so tiny I didn’t want to end up treading on them in the house.

    In our last UK house we had a pond, so I would spend hours watching them. I bought them some nice water lilies for them to bask on too 🙂

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    1. I have to say that I was rather pleased with those photos, myself. I’m beginning to get the hang of this camera and increasingly less often using the auto settings.

      Having been so gung ho about the frogs, I’m a little more circumspect at the moment: we had a Cape Cobra on the veranda last Sunday, and which headed for the kitchen door. Husband did the macho thing, but even so. Mind you, it’s the first time we’ve had one that close to the house – in just over three years.

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